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Talk To Frank

More Regarding Talk To Frank

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

Ten years prior a police Swat group collided with a calm suburban kitchen and transformed the substance of medication education in the UK until the end of time. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. Instead, wit and fun including games were embraced.


In the first advertisement a teenager phoned a police team to detain his mother when she proposed that they had a peaceful discussion regarding drugs. But the new information being passed is: "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


The agency behind Frank has said that it was crucial that Frank was never actually seen so he could never be the target of ridicule for wearing the wrong thing or trying to be cool. Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. There's also no indication that Frank is working for the government, which is unusual for a government funded campaign.

Teaching people about drugs is now approached in a different way, not like the days of Nancy Reagan in the UK and the cast of Grange Hill in the UK, who told us to "Just Say No" to drugs; it is evident this did not work.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the UK, the Above the Influence campaign has cost the federal government millions of dollars and uses humour and cautionary stories to encourage people to choose positive alternatives to drugs The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. Around the world, a good number of anti-drug campaigns still use the scare tricks of old, "descent into hell," being one of the most used. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

Inquire about into a UK anti-drugs movements in the vicinity of 1999 and 2004 proposes promotions demonstrating the antagonistic impacts of medication mishandle can regularly empower youngsters "on the edges of society" to explore different avenues regarding drugs.


Frank was ground-breaking and criticised by Conservative politicians at the time because they felt it suggest that there were some good things to go along with all the bad about drugs.


One primary online promotion educated viewers: "Cocaine makes you feel high and in charge."

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. Matt Powell was the creative director of digital agency Profero, the company that came up with the cocaine ad; he now thinks he miscalculated the time an average user spends on browsing the internet. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. However, Powell says the point was to be more legitimate with youngsters about medications, keeping in mind the end goal to build up the believability of the Frank brand.

One survey said that 67 percent of young people would call Frank if they needed advice about drugs. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. The argument is that this is proof that the approach is working.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a nationwide drug education programme designed and run by the British government's Department of Health in collaboration with the Home Office in 2003. It's main aim is to inform young people about the dangers of alcohol and drugs, so as to bring down the rate of consumption of both legal and illegal drugs. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


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Services

FRANK offers the following services for those who are looking for info and/or guidance regarding drugs:

  • A website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • A live private chat service that's available from 2 pm - 6 pm every day
  • A service to find treatment and counselling