Schedule: Monday - Sunday - 00:00 - 24:00

The Brain And Dependency

Changes In The Brain Because Of Addictive Substances

Addictive substances causes changes in the brain over time. As the addiction increases, effects on the brain makes users choose drug use over other things.


The moment a person develops dependence, his or her brain is highly set to use substances in spite of the effects. Cravings for the substance can occur even after a lot of time has passed because any feelings or situations connected to the previous drug abuse can cause them, even though physical effects of a dependency are no longer present. Rehabilitation is, however, still possible. But patients should understand that treatment is a continuous process. Dependence therapy is growing each day and has quickly bettered over the past years. If you or an individual you love is fighting to defeat dependence, acquire aid straight away.


How Do Addictions Develop

The human brain is an intricate organ managing all willing and unwilling step we embrace. Our attitude, breathing, how we think and decide on issues, and other important skills are dictated by the brain. If an individual consumes an addictive drug, the limbic system discharges chemicals that make the exploiter feel great. Repeated drug abuse is encouraged by this. Thanks to specific modifications that the brain's rewards system has experienced, a person will, despite dangerous consequences, feel a severe, involuntary craving to use a drug. Fulfilling the addiction becomes the first priority.


There is a section of the brain in charge of addiction. This section of the brain is known as the limbic system. It causes us to feel elated and is also called "brain reward system".



Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Igniting The Brain Reward System

The ill-use of addictive drugs sparks off the brain reward system. Dependency might occur if a person often triggers this system with a substance. The brain reward system is usually sparked off when we engage in practices that are great for us. This is all part of natural instincts for adopting and survival. So, the brain thinks that something significant for the survival is occurring every time something triggers this system. That action is then rewarded by the brain by releasing enjoyable emotions.


For instance, we drink water again because the reward system is switched on each time we are thirsty and quench that thirst with water. Dependent substances hijack this system, leading to emotions of joy for activities that are really dangerous. Addictive drugs, sadly, have more powerful effects on the brain reward system.


Dependency Biochemistry

Dopamine has a critical function in the reward system. Dopamine is a natural element in the brain which releases signals to the reward system. When presented into the reward system, substances sometime ape dopamine or lead to an excessive production of it inside the brain.

Because the dopamine they produce is insignificant, regular activities like food, music, sex, and drinking, do not alter the brain and cause dependence although they can switch on the reward system.

The dopamine released by addictive substances can be up to 10 times more than the amount released from normal actions.

Substance use overloads neuroreceptors with dopamine. This makes one feel "high", similar to when you take drugs. After a prolonged addiction, the human brain cannot produce normal amounts of dopamine naturally. The reward system becomes enslaved by the addictive substances.

Dopamine levels should go back to the original level, this triggers the desire for addictive substances. Not taking the drug automatically leads to despondency for such addicts.


Neurofeedback In Addiction

Neurofeedback is one of the most effective treatments for dependency. It is also referred to as (EEG)Electroencephalogram, Biofeedback. Neurofeedback trains the brain to learn to function better. The therapy controller is supervising the brain activity while this process is being done by using sensors on the scalp. When the brain changes its own activities for the better and to more healthier routines, the administrator rewards it.

Underlying problems that might be activating addiction are targeted by neurofeedback and these problems are:

  • Being depressed
  • Unnecessary worries
  • Severe depression
  • Insomnia

By supporting the brain to readapt how to be without substances, neurofeedback has shown to be a really victorious dependence treatment for a good number of people. Neurofeedback is a vital part of extensive recovery scheme at many treatment facilities. If you need assistance, contact us on 0800 246 1509 and we will find one for you.